Sunday, October 11, 2009

AUTUMNJONES WANTS YOU TO MEET: Writer Brian Wallington

When did you realize you were a writer and that you could make a career of it?
I realized that I was a writer about 11th grade 2000/2001 but I didn’t think of making it a career until about my 3rd year of college. Sometimes you don’t realize your gifts are given to you for a reason and you need to utilize them.

When you write an article do you think of the different reactions from the audience?How does that affect your thought process?
Of course, but I'm not usually concerned with emotional reactions. I believe the success of your writing depends on capturing your audience and making sure you give them the opportunity comprehend it. I always consider the most efficient way to get the concepts and/or the story across to the reader. Since I commonly write from a peripheral angle I think it is important to be succinct and lead the reader directly through the article so they can not only follow your points but see how you arrived at them, this allows them to walk away with a slightly more rounded perspective, whether they advocate it or antagonize it. There will always be diverse reactions.

Who are some of your favorite writers?How did you learn from them,yet also differentiate yourself?
I do a lot of publication reading, so I would have to use the NYTimes.com staff as a whole because it’s hard to pick one or two of them and Jemele Hill from ESPN. The NYTimes staff is very direct and descriptive with no wasted words; writing is such a creative process you have to give people the best brush possible to paint the picture. That includes word selection, structure, and thoroughness; all of those are traits I try to furnish my pieces with. As far as Jemele Hill, the biggest thing I’ve learned from her is to think outside the box, we hear it so much but we don’t always apply it. Although I’ve learned these things I understand that writing is entertainment (in some cases more than others), so I try to develop a style that incorporates the aforementioned traits but also stimulates the reader’s wit and gives them something to make them say, “Ahhh, that’s interesting”.

You went to University of Eastern Michigan,where you studied various communication topics.What other training can you credit as your inspiration?
I have to point this out because I think it was pivotal for me, I had a Public Discourse class that really sent my brain into overdrive, we talked a lot about exigencies and catalyst, and this is all about what causes actions to happen not the actions themselves. Also if X is going to happen then what needs to take place first. One of the most important things I took from that It made me really look at writing and the world in general from a more diverse perspective and in turn I'm able to introduce these ideas that we don’t regularly think of into my pieces. Other training (informal) that warrants a lot of credit is my magazine habit, I’ve always been heavily into one magazine or another and I think the more you read the better your instincts become for things like sentence structure, style, and writing charisma. Reading can do wonders for your writing.

You have a very successful blog; Plush Red Sofa. Do you feel that has helped the success of your freelancing career?
Not so much, perhaps in small ways. My primary motive was for
plushredsofa.blogspot.com to be my training facility. To put it into basketball terms, that’s where I work on my jump shot. I believe it is paramount to work on your craft whatever that may be. However I am glad that people have enamored it so much, and therefore I try to be quite loyal to them to the readership. Honestly you never know who has come by to check it out so it may have even helped me more ways than I am aware of.

What are some of the downsides of maintaining a blog and successful freelance career? How do you stay motivated?
Communicating is what gives me my adrenaline and writing is a form of that. I am always going to want to write. Actually, the more I write the more motivated I am because I love seeing wonderful pieces created from a blank canvas. Finding quality material to do consistent posting on a blog can be difficult at times especially when you are immersed in other projects. I try to maximize my time and not be wasteful of hours, minutes, and seconds. So sometimes my blog may be mildly neglected but I know that it’s not in vain.

What niches do you think are the hottest for freelance writers to get into at the moment?
I actually think technology is saturated with opportunities, because technology in general is growing by leaps and bounds every day and with it being such a specialized field it’s not something anyone can efficiently elaborate on. Many of the subjective fields like fashion and sports are a little more crowded.

I know you've branched out recently starting, Wallington Ink.Tell us a little more about the company and how important it is to you?
Wallington Ink. is THE consolidated source for all things written. We compose bio, press release, album reviews, articles, you name it. The company is an extension of me. As a well rounded individual I found that I needed to break the stigma of being pigeon holed into specialization i.e. a sports writer or a fashion writer. I felt that by creating the company it would be easier for me to break those barriers as opposed to being an individual.

You've contributed to outlets such as; Michigan FrontPage Newspaper, Giantmag.com, Hypetrak/Hypebeast.com, Examiner.com, Suite101.com, and Drop Magazine. What encouraging words would you give to an upcoming writer, who's trying to figure out the ropes of being published with an established companies?
Initially you just have to throw yourself out there. Take on projects and develop relationships with people and as you amass more work then more doors will be opened for you, people will also seek you out. One of the most important yet underrated aspects is the conviction and confidence you need to have in yourself and your abilities, because often you will have to approach companies or publications with ideas of what you can write for them and why. You really need to be able to sell them that vision of why it is a solid piece to write and also why you’re the person to write it.

Where do you see yourself and Wallington Ink in 10 years?

I maintain that my writing company Wallington Ink. will be a renown and respected firm for the quality of work we produce. I have a vision of employing talented in-house writers that would be available for any publication and therefore changing the landscape of freelance writing as a whole. I hope to have expanded upon my upcoming magazine Goldenstaple.com. As far as myself I just hope that I am in a position to assist people with their dreams and visions.

What do you want people to take from you as a person?

I'm a very caring man who looks to enhance the world’s perspective and views about how we live, think, and treat each other. Regardless of what my company does or what status I elevate to, I want to provide value to people. Although I am technically considered media it’s hard for me to approach issues and stories like traditional media pundits and sensationalize them one way or another. Some of my most influential inspirations are people like Martin Luther King Jr., he just made the world a better place than it was before he got here and I think if each of us look to do that then we should be alright


For More on Brian Wallington
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Golden Staple (coming soon)

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

I wish he could have explained what GoldenStaple was a little more and how it will be different the WallingtonInk.