Saturday, August 07, 2010

Buying Beyonce Has Ended Racism According to Staffordshire University Professor




I woke up to this article Beyonce Sells New Dream for the Obama Age in my inbox and i had to read it. The article discuses how 'Buying Beyonce' ends racism towards black women. "She sells a new America Dream based on an idea.-that racism is over" Says Professor Ellis Cashmere. Now my first reaction is Racism is NOT over, period point blank. Nor does Beyonce's career have anything to do with everyday lives, of other people. What i find funny (well not really) is how he wants the world to believe that Beyonce image sells the everyday black women. Beyonce is a very talented woman, who just so happens to be black. But i only buy Beyonce for her talents. Not her intelligence, not her personality, not her image, or her body. With that said Beyonce's sells has everything to do with her promotions because everyone isn't feeling here image or music. Through the years she's watered down a lot for cross over appeal. That's not ending racism, that's just changing who you are for everyone else to be okay.


The article talks a lot about her successes and explains that if Beyonce and other artist can emerge from their circumstances that regular black people can too. That i do agree with yet at the same time they've gotten where they've gotten but they didn't get there easily. The professor needs to understand that people are chasing the money of these artist, not them.

Either way black artist have always been on top of their game in music. They were just over looked! Beyonce is no different and outside of her hard work, she has to work even harder to not be the "expected" Black woman. Music can bring all colors lines together but if it was going to end racism, it would have done it with Michael Jackson. To me this is just another example of how white people will never understand racism.

1 comment:

suha said...

I read the article "Buying Beyonce" the author of which makes a very clear point in the abstract of the article : "limitless consumer choice has become a substitute for equality... A refusal to conform to existing categories combined with an insistence on the primacy of the market makes Beyonce an exquisite commodity in a celebrity-fixated consumer culture although an unreliable indicator of black America."